Category Archives: Food As Medicine

Pea Flour—Looks Good on the Label but Doesn’t Digest

Pea Flour—Looks Good on the Label but Doesn’t Digest

Manufacturers are increasingly using pea flour in the production of low-carbohydrate foods. These days you’ll find it in pasta, chips, cookies, energy bars, and even dog food. Because it’s up to 28% protein, pea flour looks good on an ingredient label, but there’s a catch. It’s indigestible. We’ll look at why this questionable practice got… Continue Reading

Startled Into Eating Meat Again

Eating Meat Helped Resolve My Invasive Cancer As a longtime fan of yours, I remember reading that when you had cancer, you started eating meat again. I’m at a dietary crossroads myself and would love to know why you made the shift. —Syl Stenhouse, London, England In 1989, after twenty years of macrobiotics, then renowned… Continue Reading

Which Salt Is Best? Do a Taste Test!

There must be as much hype about salt as there are salt varieties. In this blog, I’ll share science-based guidelines for making the most flavorful and nutritious choices, plus a do-it-yourself home test. The first guideline for buying salt is to favor additive-free, unrefined sea salt, as it contains valuable trace minerals and is free… Continue Reading

A Step Up from Sweet Potato Toast

Toasted sweet potato, the latest alternative to bread, has recently been sweeping the social media scene. Given the number of people on grain-free diets, this innovative “toast” now serves as a sandwich base in many a lunchbox. While popping a slice of sweet potato in a toaster wins points for cleverness, I prefer to make… Continue Reading

Healthy Way to Enjoy Seaweed

Better Than Chips I used to indulge in potato chips and am delighted to report that this is past tense. I now opt for a savory and phenomenally healthful treat that’s equally crunchy. Thanks to toasted seaweed (which happens to be among our most nutrient-dense plants), I don’t miss packaged chips. Toasted sea palm has… Continue Reading

Dandelion Hearts (Crowns)

The top of a dandelion’s taproot, its heart or crown, is a tasty nibble that, while money can’t buy, is free for the taking. In texture, color, and taste dandelion hearts are reminiscent of the base or heart of a head of celery, only with a light bitter-sweet dandelion essence. Adorning the crown are pearl-sized nascent buds,… Continue Reading

Cultured Foods for Your Kitchen: 100 Recipes Featuring the Bold Flavors of Fermentation

Here’s a truly great cookbook, Cultured Foods for Your Kitchen: 100 Recipes Featuring the Bold Flavors of Fermentation, by Leda Scheintaub (Rizzoli), 2014, 192 pages. While this book offers readers new to fermenting plenty of entry points, more accomplished cooks will find ideas for expanding their repertoires. Just as fermentation transforms food with a natural alchemy, Cultured Foods for Your Kitchen opens up… Continue Reading



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