Category Archives: Fermented Foods

Fermented Turmeric Tea

Medicine from Scratch To enhance turmeric’s medicinal wallop, ferment it. In five minutes of your time (plus two days to ferment), you can create a base for a month’s supply of tasty and healing fermented turmeric tea. Best known for its characteristic bright orange-yellow color and as a signature ingredient in curry, turmeric is the… Continue Reading

Millet Polenta Cakes with Zucchini, Daikon, Cherry Tomatoes, and Cilantro-Miso Pesto

Reprinted with permission from Cultured Foods for your Kitchen by Leda Scheintaub. Photo by William Brinson. This recipe is an extension of the Fermented Millet Porridge concept (and a riff on the French-style chickpea flour–based bites known as panisse); after you’ve made your porridge, you pour it onto a baking sheet to firm up, then… Continue Reading

Fermented Millet Porridge

Reprinted with permission from Leda Scheintaub’s Cultured Foods for Your Kitchen Millet becomes surprisingly thick and creamy when it’s fermented (see Three Reasons to Soak, Sprout and/or Ferment Grains) and then cooked, making it a satisfying breakfast option for folks who are dairy free and those just looking to add more whole grains into their… Continue Reading

Fermented Cranberry Relish

Fermentation is the secret to this fresh sweet and sour cranberry relish. If you haven’t yet made a cultured food, let this foolproof recipe be your gateway to tangible kitchen magic. Yes, you can effortlessly transform the flavor and healthfulness of basic ingredients into a superior product. I delight in the simplicity of this recipe… Continue Reading

Fruit Kvass

The historic Russian beverage kvass is traditionally made by fermenting rye bread,  and often fruit, into an invigorating and effervescent drink. It’s currently marketed in Russia as a patriotic—and more healthful—soft drink alternative. My version is an ambrosial grain-free nectar that’s oh-so-easy to make. What does it taste like? A tangy blend of sweet and… Continue Reading

Pickles for Health

Accompanying recipe: Dilled Red Radish, Carrot and Cauliflower Pickles You probably know that quality yogurt and pickles are remarkably healthful fermented foods that aid digestion and strengthen your immune system.  However, not everyone knows that pasteurization strips their superfood ranking by destroying  fragile nutrients such as lactic acid micro-flora.  Therefore, insist on living fermented foods including… Continue Reading

Three Reasons to Soak, Sprout and/or Ferment Grains, Beans, Nuts and Seeds

Enhanced flavor is the first of three important reasons to soak grains, beans, nuts and seeds. To further blossom the flavor of these seeds, they can also be fermented or sprouted. In your mind’s eye, mentally compare the full, rich flavors and aromas of fermented sourdough bread to the more simple aroma and flavor profile… Continue Reading

Kefir–Health Benefits

Kefir is a creamy, tangy and tasty fermented milk beverage that is more healthful than yogurt. It builds immunity and imparts a sense of well being. A daily glass of kefir is a delicious and fuss-free way to support your energy and overall health (unless that is, you’re sensitive to casein in which case all dairy products are contraindicated). You… Continue Reading

Home Brewed Cider

Accompanying article: Kefir Using the same kefir grains (see Kefir—Homemade) as for making kefir milk, you can make a variety of healthful, lactic-acid fermented beverages. Sandor Katz, writes in Wild Fermentation that “You can kefir fruit or vegetable juice, or water with any sweetener you like, or rice milk, soymilk, or nut milk. Cranberry juice… Continue Reading

Dilled Red Radish, Carrot and Cauliflower Pickles

Accompanying Newsletter: Pickles for Health   I typically serve a little pickle with a meal. Primarily because home made pickles are so delicious, but also because they are a healthy addiction. These pickles are my family’s favorite. They are a simple salt-water fermentation of the kind that our grandmothers used to make. In late summer… Continue Reading



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